Succession Planting Explained

Robin Ripley's Mimosa-tree trellis supported peas early in the season; now it's holding up cucumber vines.

by Susan Harris
Succession planting seems so esoteric, so advanced (to this newbie veg gardener) that I’ve been intimidated by the very notion of sowing vegetable seed throughout the season.  So I’m exploring the best sources I can find on the subject and passing them along.

If you’ve never visited the blog A Way to Garden, I recommend you check out this top-ranked individual garden blog.  Its popularity is no surprise because blogger Margaret Roach was Martha’s Stewart Living’s editorial director for decades and having retired from the fast lane, she’s put her many skills to use online, free for the reading.

So when I heard Margaret mention on her weekly radio show that she’d finally devoted the time needed to explain succession gardening, I immediately looked for it online and liked what I saw.   If you prefer learning by listening, she explained the basics during her 6/7 radio show.  (Don’t be shocked to hear mention me at 20:16 minutes; we had a good-natured disagreement over the identification of a creeping sedum.  She definitely won that round.)

Margaret’s in Zone 4, so adjust the dates by two weeks or so, and consult the Planting Dates for Maryland from our (most excellent) Extension Service.  Or choose from dozens of excellent online publications about all types of gardening.

About the photo: Robin Ripley’s vegetable garden is in Calvert  County.  She blogs at BumblebeeBlog.com.

One Response to Succession Planting Explained

  1. How sweet of you — and I also love being in the company of Robin; thank you on all fronts.

    I smile when I think that it is to me that you have turned for Sedum taxonomical advice, since I mix them up all the time when I’m outside. Just don’t take me away from my very serious library of very boring Latin books or I will be lost!

    Oh, and I am a USDA 5B Zone-wise, though I have always coddled many Zone 6 things the last 25 years here, being (your words) a troublemaker. : )

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